Manifesto for International Animal Protection Group

Written by Koji Anderson

Animals should be treated with love and respect.  They are our friends not our servants.   They are not entertainment; they are not here to entertain us.

Animals suffer when their needs and expectations and desires are not met. All mammals, humans and animals, have the same structures in a part of the brain called the limbic system, which is primarily responsible for our emotional life and the formation of memories. Mammals also share the same neurochemicals that are important for processing emotions. Animals may well experience some things more intensely than humans.

We should treat them with respect and love. They deserve no less. No human should cause suffering to an animal in the pursuit of their own interests.

Animals are not objects. Animals are not property.   We do not own them. There has been a paradigm shift among scientists who study ethology, animal behaviour. With the aid of new technology like functional MRI, scientists have come to understand that animals have emotions and feelings and are intelligent.

Yasushi

We know animals suffer from post traumatic stress disorder, they suffer the same symptoms that humans do.

Animals have a point of view.

Tread lightly when stepping into their lives and their homes/habitats.

Animal manifesto: “Treat us better or leave us alone”.

Most animals have done very well without us.

This was inspired by Yasushi, a former breeding male at Nagasaki Bio Park. When his time as breeding male finished he moved to Kyoto Zoo where he lived alone, in complete isolation. He died after a few months of depression brought on by his isolation. Capybaras are an exceptionally social and gregarious species who should never be housed alone.

This is what I wrote last year, it was never to be: Magnificent Yasushi. I hope he is voted ‘Most Popular Capybara in Japan’ one day; he so deserves it with his charismatic personality, gentle nature, exceptionally expressive face and amazingly long hair.

There must be a better future for retired Boss Capybaras than solitary confinement.

Everything about him was exceptional;  I wish he had had many more children.

How To Recognise If Your Capybara Is Unwell  如何識別你的水豚生病了 あなたのカピバラが病気であることを認識する方法

Changes: Look out for changes in Behaviour and New Symptoms:

Some of these changes apply to other conditions not just diarrhea. You should always be very familiar with your capybara and his body language so that you quickly recognise when he is not well even when he is trying to hide this. Having spent so many years with capybaras, observing them all day every day, I can always tell when there is something wrong with a capybara. I never get bored in the company of capybaras. I spend much more time with my friends’ capybaras observing them, than my friends and other people who live with capybaras, do.

Kobuko is obviously not well as you can see by her behaviour and in her eyes.

You can tell that Donguri is not well by the look in her eye and her body language. She looks miserable.

Changes in the consistency or colour of the faeces.

A deterioration in the condition of the coat. Bald patches in the coat. Loss of hair.

Loss of appetite

The capybara becoming thin or lethargic.

Hiding may also be a sign that the capybara’s condition is growing worse.

Discomfort when trying to sit or rest in the normal positions, such that the capybara keeps shifting position.

Rolling. This can be a sign of wind but it can also be a sign of other discomfort the cause of which might be serious.

The eyes looking sunken. This can also be a sign of dehydration.

Capybaras like many wild animals will hide any signs of illness until it may be too late for treatment. Because of this you need to know your capybara very well and be observant and sensitive to any           changes. This behaviour of hiding any illness or weakness is designed to protect the wild animal from attack by a predator as predators often choose the weakest animals to attack. Sick, weak or             injured animals will not put up much of a fight.

Teeth grinding, which can also be a sign of tooth problems. Tooth problems can lead to drooling and frothing at the mouth.

Tooth problems may make it very painful for your capybara to chew and I know several capybaras who died as a result of tooth problems. The wrong diet may well be the cause of tooth problems. Capybaras have hypsodont, ever-growing teeth, which need to be kept in check by eating coarse, fibrous food.

A hunched appearance

A reluctance to move

A cough

Vocalisations indicating pain

Unusual, repetitive movements. These can include lifting the nose or shaking the head.

Capybaras have very expressive eyes and if they are suffering you can see this by the look in their eye, as well as by their body language.

Gastrointestinal stasis – when a decrease in the contractions in the intestine results in food not passing through the gut at the usual rate. When a capybara stops eating there is a real danger of      gastrointestinal stasis. This can also be caused by the wrong diet and a lack of fibre in the diet.

There are motility drugs to increase the movement of food through the intestine but these should only be prescribed by a vet.

If you buy vegetables for your capybara make sure you clean them thoroughly to get rid of any residual contaminants and chemicals which might be harmful.

Do not feed inappropriate food.

Good sanitation and hygiene may be important.

Remove uneaten food if your capybara is not eating properly.

Do not use chlorine in your swimming pool. At least one capybara died as a result of chlorine in the pool. I have written a blog on how to treat a swimming pool to make it safe for a capybara.

Capybara Health Warning: It Will Be Potentially Dangerous To Let Your Capybara Swim in a Chlorinated Swimming Pool Designed and Intended for Human Use

Diarrhea in Capybaras. How to Treat A Capybara with Diarrhea. 如何治療水豚腹瀉 下痢でカピバラを治療する方法

If the diarrhea does not clear up quickly you should consult your vet

The importance of coarse foods like grass and hay cannot be overemphasised. Lack of fibre in the diet can change the normal bowel movements in the intestines which can cause diarrhea or predispose a capybara to other health issues.

Causes Of Diarrhea:

Diarrhea can be the result of an underlying health condition.

Metabolic disturbances or diseases which affect the liver, kidney or pancreas. Do not feed a high-fat diet, like peanuts or birdseed, to a capybara as these can cause liver damage. These high-calorie foods will also mean that your capybara is not hungry enough to eat the grass and hay which are essential to his well-being.

Diseases which affect the gastrointestinal tract.

Gastrointestinal stasis – when a decrease in the contractions in the intestine results in food not passing through the gut at the usual rate. When a capybara stops eating there is a real danger of      gastrointestinal stasis, and this can lead to death.

Gastrointestinal stasis can also be caused by the wrong diet and a lack of fibre in the diet.

Eating inappropriate food or non-food items like plastic bags or household furnishings can cause irritation to the lining of the gut and can also cause blockages in the gut leading to stasis.

Changes to diet, particularly if the capybara is not receiving an adequate amount of fibre. One suggestion is to remedy this by increasing the amount of hay and reducing the amount of pellets

A diet which is low on fibre and the necessary vegetation.

A diet with too much sugar.

Infections caused by bacteria, viruses, fungus or intestinal parasites

Toxins including those found in plants such as the Azalea, or berries such as the berries of the China berry tree, just 8 of which can kill a man.

Drugs, particularly antibiotics, can cause diarrhea. Any drug which causes diarrhea should be immediately discontinued.

Contaminated water.

You can tell that Donguri is not well by the look in her eye and her body language. She looks miserable.

Stress Can Cause Diarrhea

Stress can change the normal pH or the motility of the gastrointestinal tract. Keep the capybara’s environment as stressfree as possible for optimum healing.

The following circumstances can cause stress:

Changes to diet

Changes in the environment

Moving to a new home or habitat and the stress associated with this can cause diarrhea.

Heat and humidity

Becoming pregnant may also cause stress.

Pregnancy also puts extra demands on the body which only a healthy capybara may be able to cope with.

The stress caused by not having a place of refuge or a place to hide

The arrival of a new pet, or the arrival of a new animal in the capybara’s enclosure or in an adjacent enclosure, can lead to problems both emotional and physical. The ensuing stress may ultimately be            lethal. One rodentologist thought the arrival of a new pet, a yappy Yorkshire terrier, may have been the reason why one capybara I know gave up the will to live.

If a Capybara Has Diarrhea Her Cecotropes Will Come Out Runny, With the Consistency of Diarrhea

in this video: Autumn’s mother, Aki, died 5 days after she and her brother, Syu, were born. Aki’s poor health during the later stages of her pregnancy had an impact on the health of her 2 pups, both of whom, very sadly, died when they were 2 years old. Zabon had had diarrhea for over a year so it was surprising she was chosen to be mated. After she gave birth she lost a lot of weight and a lot of hair. In this video you can see Zabon eating her cecotropes which have come out with the consistency of diarrhea. I have seen the other capybaras with diarrhea eating their cecotropes which came up with the consistency of diarrhea, including Kobuko. On one occasion, greedy Aoba ate Autumn’s cecotropes which had come out with the consistency of diarrhea. Aoba suffered no ill effects. Capybaras have an excellent immune system. Needless to say these capybaras never ate their diarrhea when they knew it was not their cecotropes.          

Diagnostic tools:

Examination of the faeces.

Full blood count.

X-ray.

Abdominal ultrasound

Pending a diagnosis one aim of treatment is to prevent dehydration, loss of appetite or the spread of the disease to other parts of the body

Fluid Therapy: the purpose of this is to prevent dehydration by ensuring that the capybara drinks plenty of clean fresh water

Treatments:

if your vet prescribes medications it is essential that you give these to your capybara exactly as directed. If your capybara’s condition deteriorates you should contact your vet as a matter of urgency.

Antibiotics to treat an infection, including bacterial infections. The choice of antibiotic will depend on the result of the faecal diagnosis. Your vet will know which antibiotics are safe and best for a capybara. Any drug which causes diarrhea should be immediately discontinued.

Change the diet if necessary. If you introduce changes to the diet make sure you do this very gradually. It is very important to maintain consistency with your capybaras diet, i.e. give him the same foods for          the most part.

Do not only feed pellets.

Maintain a stressfree environment.

Give plenty of liquids.

Your vet might prescribe a De–worming medication to treat intestinal parasites.

If your capybara stops eating it is essential that he gets nutrition by any means possible. You may have to force-feed your capybara a liquid critical care formula like EmerAid, using a feeding tube.

Force-feeding will only be necessary if your capybara stops eating. It is essential that the capybara continues to receive nutrition to maintain his strength, but also to ensure that the gastrointestinal tract continues to function normally. Use a liquid critical care formula such as EmerAid as these provide the correct nutrition in an emergency situation.

EmerAid: A Critical Care Formula designed for exotic animals

This information comes from the vet at EmerAid.

To calculate the correct dosage for a capybara use the following guidelines:

Although the volumes mentioned in the EmerAid Basic Use Guide, refer to smaller patients, the general guidelines for calculating volume still remain the same.

When initially syringe or tube feeding a patient, the first feeding is often calculated between 0.5% to 1% body weight (BW) in kilograms. Therefore, the first meeting fed would consist of a volume of ~250 to 500 ml for the first feeding. Assuming this passed through the patient appropriately, the volume fed could be increased cautiously over the next few feedings to 3% BW.

If syringe/tube feeding is continued for an extended period, then it will be necessary to calculate caloric requirements, but initially you just want to make sure you are providing a safe volume to the patient.

Conservative Treatments:

An excellent conservative treatment is to give a probiotic such as Benebac or Fibreplex. Probiotics containing the lactobacillus bacteria, which are “good” bacteria help to provide a better environment in the intestinal tract for normal, healthy bacteria to thrive

Activated Charcoal, also known as vegetable charcoal. This was recommended by a vet at a Wildlife Park in France, where it is called “Charbon actif”.

This is a natural detoxifier. It absorbs the harmful bacteria causing the diarrhoea but will protect the walls of the intestine and the good intestinal flora in the capybara’s gut. In France it comes in powder, capsules and granules. It can be sprinkled on the food or given directly into the mouth. Dosage: 1 capsule, 1 or 2 times a day, for 2 weeks. If your capybara is taking other medications with his food then give the charcoal outside of meals as the charcoal will cancel the effect of other medications if given at the same time.

Video:

If a Capybara Has Diarrhea Her Cecotropes Will Come Out Runny, With the Consistency of Diarrhea

Autumn’s mother, Aki, died 5 days after she and her brother, Syu, were born. Aki’s poor health during the later stages of her pregnancy had an impact on the health of her 2 pups, both of whom, very sadly, died when they were 2 years old. Zabon had had diarrhea for over a year so it was surprising she was chosen to be mated. After she gave birth she lost a lot of weight and a lot of hair. In this video you can see Zabon eating her cecotropes which have come out with the consistency of diarrhea. I have seen the other capybaras with diarrhea eating their cecotropes which came up with the consistency of diarrhea, including Kobuko. On one occasion, greedy Aoba ate Autumn’s cecotropes which had come out with the consistency of diarrhea. Aoba suffered no ill effects. Capybaras have an excellent immune system. Needless to say these capybaras never ate their diarrhea when they knew it was not their cecotropes.          

Case Histories:

These are the case histories of capybaras I have known who have suffered.

Diet:

Introducing a new food for the first time to a capybara could result in diarrhea.

Fruit, especially watermelon, can cause diarrhoea. I know several capybaras who experienced diarrhea after eating watermelon. One tragically died as she never recovered from the diarrhea caused by eating watermelon. She was an elderly capybara.

In Memory of Kobuko, A Wonderful Capybara

Kobuko had been so strong and healthy until she got diarrhea. After about 10 days I noticed she had stopped eating so I told the management of Nagasaki Bio Park. The vet diagnosed a bacterial infection and put her on antibiotics but tragically it was probably too late and she passed away. I wished I had spoken up sooner but it was my first visit to Nagasaki Bio Park. I was the only person who had noticed that Kobuko was suffering.

I want to pick her up in my arms and make her better. This is the day Kobuko stopped eating (23rd August). She is very dehydrated and walks to the pond to drink. It is difficult for her, in her weakened state to bend down to drink from the pond because the water level one foot is one foot below the side of the pond where she is standing. She has a drink and rests for a minute. She tries to bend down again but finds it too difficult. Seeing this I ask the Keeper if I can fill one of the watermelon trays with water for her. He very kindly washes it himself and takes it to her. When the water level gets a bit low, she lifts the pan with her teeth, spilling the remaining water. I refill the tray for her. It breaks my heart to think that she would be alive today if I had realised earlier how dangerous the diarrhoea would be.

I know one capybara who had never eaten grass during the first four years of his life. When he was fed grass for the first time this resulted in him having diarrhea. Normally grass would be the best food to feed a capybara.

Potential Causes of Diarrhea:

The capybara might have an Impaired immune system. The immune system of a capybara may be compromised as a result of the poor health of the mother during pregnancy, or a failure to receive colostrum by drinking the mother’s milk in the first 12 – 24 hours of birth. A severe injury or an infection can also compromise the immune system. I know two capybaras who were rescued from their mother’s womb after hunters killed her mother. These capybaras suffered as a result of two separate incidents, so the two pups were not related and there was no connection between their horrific introduction to life. As a result of their unnatural birth, including the fact that they were never able to drink their mother’s milk and receive her colostrum, both capybaras died prematurely at two and three years of age following many bouts of diarrhea. They both never recovered from the final bout of diarrhea.

An infection or injury early in life may also result in a compromised immune system. I know one capybara one of whose incisions became infected after he was neutered. The infection took a long time to clear with constant antibiotic treatment from the vet. In subsequent years this capybara often experienced diarrhea, especially after eating watermelon.

Another female capybara I know suffered bouts of diarrhea. These grew worse when her health suffered as a result of the stresses of pregnancy and giving birth. Very misguidedly, she was chosen to mate with the breeding male capybara for a second time the following year and tragically she died two months after giving birth.

The mother of two capybaras I know died 5 days after they were born. Both her pups only lived for 2 years because of their mothers’ poor health during her pregnancy.

Stress

The two capybaras I mentioned above who were rescued from their mother’s womb after hunters murdered the mother suffered a lot of stress in infancy. An autopsy on one of the capybaras discovered she had hepatitis which the vet thought was as a result of the circumstances of her birth.

It might be advisable to stop feeding vegetables for a short while to give the diarrhea time to clear up. For a short time you could try feeding your capybara pellets, which contain vitamin C, and hay.

How to Recognise If Your Capybara Is Unwell:

Changes: Look out for changes in Behaviour and New Symptoms:

Some of these changes apply to other conditions not just diarrhea. You should always be very familiar with your capybara and his body language so that you quickly recognise when he is not well even when he is trying to hide this.

Changes in the consistency or colour of the faeces.

A deterioration in the condition of the coat. Bald patches in the coat. Loss of hair.

Loss of appetite

The capybara becoming thin or lethargic.

Hiding may also be a sign that the capybara’s condition is growing worse.

Discomfort when trying to sit or rest in the normal positions, such that the capybara keeps shifting position.

Rolling. This can be a sign of wind but it can also be a sign of other discomfort the cause of which might be serious.

The eyes looking sunken. This can also be a sign of dehydration.

Capybaras like many wild animals will hide any signs of illness until it may be too late for treatment. Because of this you need to know your capybara very well and be observant and sensitive to any           changes. This behaviour of hiding any illness or weakness is designed to protect the wild animal from attack by a predator as predators often choose the weakest animals to attack. Sick, weak or             injured animals will not put up much of a fight.

Teeth grinding, which can also be a sign of tooth problems. Tooth problems can lead to drooling and frothing at the mouth.

Tooth problems may make it very painful for your capybara to chew and I know several capybaras who died as a result of tooth problems. The wrong diet may well be the cause of tooth problems. Capybaras have hypsodont, ever-growing teeth, which need to be kept in check by eating coarse, fibrous food.

A hunched appearance

A reluctance to move

A cough

Vocalisations indicating pain

Unusual, repetitive movements. These can include lifting the nose or shaking the head.

Capybaras have very expressive eyes and if they are suffering you can see this by the look in their eye, as well as by their body language.

Gastrointestinal stasis – when a decrease in the contractions in the intestine results in food not passing through the gut at the usual rate. When a capybara stops eating there is a real danger of      gastrointestinal stasis. This can also be caused by the wrong diet and a lack of fibre in the diet.

There are motility drugs to increase the movement of food through the intestine but these should only be prescribed by a vet.

If you buy vegetables for your capybara make sure you clean them thoroughly to get rid of any residual contaminants and chemicals which might be harmful.

Do not feed inappropriate food.

Good sanitation and hygiene may be important.

Remove uneaten food if your capybara is not eating properly.

Do not use chlorine in your swimming pool. At least one capybara died as a result of chlorine in the pool. I have written a blog on how to treat a swimming pool to make it safe for a capybara.

Capybara Health Warning: It Will Be Potentially Dangerous To Let Your Capybara Swim in a Chlorinated Swimming Pool Designed and Intended for Human Use

Meet The Capybaras at Nagasaki Bio Park and Donguri’s Family長崎バイオパークとドングリの家族でカピバラに会いましょう在長崎生物公園與水豚和 Donguri 的家人見面

Never Underestimate The Intelligence Of A Capybara

 カピバラの知性を過小評価しないでください

 永遠不要低估水豚的智慧

 

Donguri Asks for Medicine.

Most animals are very difficult to give medicine to and they reject all your attempts to give them a pill. Not Donguri, quite the opposite:

Donguri walks to the room where sick capybaras are housed to attract the attention of the keeper to show she needs medicine. A few days later she walks round and round in circles in the centre of the capybara enclosure, right in front of the stall where the keeper stands to attract his attention and indicate that she needs more medication. Donguri was so clever I would not be surprised if she exaggerated her limp and the pain she was suffering to make sure the human understood what she wanted.

 

https://youtu.be/CTYm0OV1Pns

 

Capybara Opens Entrance Gate and Goes Out to Greet Approaching Visitors To Their Absolute Amazement

 

https://youtu.be/CZ94_I6Sqf8

My YouTube channel “Capybara World:  https://www.youtube.com/c/capybaraworld

 

Exceptional Donguri, . A wonderful, compassionate and intelligent leader. どんぐりチャン。すばらしいリーダー。思いやり、賢い、インテリジェント。そして美しいです!

 

I wish the Biopark would engage with me for the benefit of their capybaras. I have studied Animal Welfare and Ethology and have been studying capybaras for the past 12 years. I have friends in Europe who have been capybara keepers for many years and I always consult with them. I have spent more time observing capybaras and their behaviour and relationships than anyone in the world. Several scientists think I know more about capybaras than anyone.

 

Donguri: born 30 September, 2004. Died early morning 17 June, 2016. Father Yasuji. Mother Katame.

Aki, born 2005 died 2012, Donguri’s very aggressive sister who was number 1 in the hierarchy the first year we visited Nagasaki Bio Park, in 2012.

After Aki’s premature death Donguri would go over to the edge of the capybara enclosure and call plaintively for her at the boundary fence. She also gave an unusual bark. Even though Donguri suffered so much because of Aki’s aggression and intimidation to her, she still felt the loss of her sister.

 

Donguri’s pups:

Fujiko and Yamato, born 2007. Father Be–be. Yamato was sent to Omiya Zoo in 2012. He died prematurely in about 2013.

Fujiko died in April 2013 6 months after giving birth to Kin and Gin. She also nursed Aki’s pups, Syu and Autumn, after Aki died. When she went back into the herd she was intimidated by some of the other capybaras and as a result of the stress, and perhaps not getting enough to eat, she died. Fujiko had been removed from the herd in early August 2012 and placed in an enclosure out of sight of the rest of the herd which was extremely stressful both for her and for the rest of the herd, particularly her daughters Hinase and Ayu, and her mother Donguri. They frequently called plaintively to Fujiko. She did not give birth for over 6 weeks after the separation so you can imagine how extremely stressful it would be for Fujiko not only to be separated from the herd but not even to be able to see them. Fortunately, this undesirable practice has been abandoned at the Bio Park after I posted research from South America showing that the dangers to a mother capybara of being separated from the herd prior to giving birth far outweigh any likelihood of the pups being attacked by other herd members when they are born. If the mother capybara is separated from the herd to give birth she will suffer great stress and may well be attacked when she is reintroduced into the herd. In my experience capybara fathers are excellent parents and even look after the pups to give their mother a chance to rest. Donut looked after Zabon’s pups even though he was not the father. The other herd members take great interest in the new arrivals and never threaten them.

Momiji, Kaede, Akkun were born 2008. Their father was Takeshi who was the breeding male at Nagasaki Bio Park prior to Yasushi. Akkun went to Nasu Animal Kingdom, and then moved to a zoo in Kumamoto. Tragically, he and other capybaras who lived in the same field died when their field was covered in volcanic ash when a nearby volcano erupted. These capybaras ingested the ash because, surprisingly, nobody realised how dangerous the ash would better their health and therefore how important it was to move the capybaras out of the field and to safety.

Ami – 2009. Father Takeshi. Died.

Donguri had 2 more pups, Yasuo and Yasuha, born 2011. Their father was Yasushi. Yasuha inherited Donguri’s wise, peaceloving personality. She was a very large capybara and was expected to become leader of the herd after Donguri. However, in 2015 Yasuha died prematurely, at only 4 years of age, as a result of an ektotropic pregnancy (where the babies form outside the womb). I was told Yasuha could have been saved if the vet had acted sooner. That year all the capybara keepers were new and had no experience of looking after capybaras. The chief capybara made a great effort for the visitors but did not seem to have much interest in the capybaras and they did not trust him.

Yasuha was not the only tragedy resulting from the inexperience of the keepers. Ayu gave birth to a pup that year. When a film crew came to film the capybaras the pup was put into the enclosure with Goemon, a male capybara who was Aki’s son. Goemon had not been neutered. Goemon attacked and killed the little pup. I felt so sorry for Ayu. As she had not produced any milk when she gave birth to her first pup, Macaroni, Macaroni was put in a separate enclosure with Momiji and Momiji’s pups, Choco and Donut. Ayu came to visit little Macaroni many times a day and they would rub noses through the bars of the fence. So Ayu never had the opportunity to bring up any of her pups.

Yasuo is the breeding male at Nagasaki Bio Park’s sister zoo Aso Farmland. He has inherited Donguri’s wonderful personality and wise, peaceloving nature, so unusually for a male capybara, his male offspring can live with him and he does not attack them. I find it very interesting that both pups from this litter inherited Donguri’s wonderful personality.

Io, a male who was not neutered, born 2012. His father was Yasushi. Io moved to a zoo in Kita Kyushu where he was put in a tiny enclosure with just a small plastic tub filled with water, with Gin (who was also born at Nagasaki Bio Park) despite the 2 of them being too closely related to be allowed to mate. Yasushi was the father of both Io and Gin, and Donguri was Gin’s grandmother and of course Io’s mother..Gin gave birth to 3 pups in 2018 – 1 was born deformed and died, one died after about a year and the third pup also died prematurely. Io moved to a zoo in Fukuoka but died in the summer of 2019 because he overheated. He had been unwell for some time and was not eating, then the keeper’s thought he was improving just before he died. Capybaras have few sweat glands so overheat easily if not cared for. This is why they need a large body of water which they can go into to submerge and thermoregulate.

Momiji gave birth to 4 pups: the males, Nina, Choco and Donut, and one female pup, Aoba. Momiji was a fantastic mother and never denied her pups milk, unlike Maple. Aoba suckled for 8 months rather than the usual 4 months grew into a magnificent, large capybara who would have been the first choice to breed in every zoo in Europe, along with Ryoko. Unfortunately, the chief capybara keeper was a very vengeful person with little understanding of animals. She tried to control the capybaras incessantly with the result that none of the capybaras trusted her. When I gave her information about Animal Welfare and tried to explain to her how European zookeepers engage with the animals in their care she decided to punish me by not letting Aoba breed. This is heartbreaking as Momiji’s offspring are the most interesting capybaras at the Bio Park. Momiji invested so much in Aoba it was tragic she did not live to be a grandmother. It is also heartbreaking that Donguri’s bloodline will not continue past Momiji and Aoba, unless Aoba is allowed to breed.

Kaede, Momiji’s sister, was a troublemaker and very aggressive and was sent to Ikeda zoo when she was 5 years old. She was Maple’s mother.

Kaede’s daughter, Maple, gave birth to 7 pups: Butter and Cookie in 2014. Cookie was sent to China, tragically. Butter is a strange capybara who does not understand the rules of the herd which is why Hinase hates her. One keeper thought Butter was the “most stupid” capybara in the herd.  The Biopark has been trying to breed Butter for the last 2 years without success, thankfully. This may be due to “reproductive suppression” wherein only the most suitable capybaras become pregnant as these are the most fit to pass on their genes. The reason they have chosen Butter is because she will allow them to handle her newborn pups. As with horses, capybaras who are not popular with their herd members gravitate to humans. This is the case with Butter. When choosing a female capybara to be mated it is essential that you understand the dynamics of the herd in question in order to choose the appropriate female.

As one enlightened keeper at a zoo in Fukuoka is on record as saying: “Animal Welfare is little understood in Japan. Most Japanese people do not understand animals.” Unfortunately he is absolutely correct.

In 2016 Maple gave birth to 5 pups: Whip, Prune, Syrup, Milk and Cream. The first 3 were male pups who were neutered.

Zabon born 2011. Her mother was Donguri’s very aggressive sister, Aki, who was number 1 in the hierarchy when I first visited the Bio Park in 2012. Her father was Yasushi.

Zabon had 2 litters. In 2018 she gave birth to Ko (male) Madoka (female). Their father was Kona.

The vengeful chief capybara keeper chose to breed Zabon for a second year despite the fact that she almost died after giving birth in 2018. Zabon became very thin and lost a lot of hair. She also had a very painful, swollen foot during her pregnancy on both occasions but because she was pregnant she could not be given antibiotics to treat it. It was heartbreaking watching Zabon trying to move on 3 legs. It was especially difficult for her to jump in and out of the pond in the heat of August when she was heavily pregnant in 2019. No European zoo would have bred Zabon for a second year after her experience the previous year, and put her through so much pain.

In 2019 Zabon gave birth to Nadishiko and Kikyo , both girls and Sasuke a boy. Sasuke died that first winter, but I do not know why. Nadeshiko was the smallest of the 3 pups and the cutest looking, she loved being petted. She grew up to be one of the most assertive capybaras in the herd, perhaps taking after her grandmother, Aki.  As soon as Zabon’s pups were born the chief capybara keeper started playing with them, and doing some of the things a mother capybara would normally do to her pups. This interfered with the bond between Zabon and her pups. In European zoos the keepers do not interact with pups for at least several days. Even if there is a problem with the newborn pup suckling, a European keeper will avoid getting involved, unless it is absolutely essential, in the hope that the problem will resolve itself naturally. It was heartbreaking watching Zabon gradually lose interest because of the behaviour of the chief capybara keeper. You could see Zabon’s negative reaction to the endless, loud admonishments “Zabon! Zabon!” which the chief capybara keeper kept shouting. Tragically Zabon died 2 months after giving birth in 2019.

I find it extremely frustrating that despite my efforts the directors of Nagasaki Bio Park have no interest in understanding Animal Welfare. As far as they are concerned the capybaras are entertainment an approach which would be unconscionable at a good Western zoo. Because Nagasaki Bio Park is so famous throughout Japan for its capybaras the Biopark is under the illusion that they are doing everything right. Nagasaki Bio Park opened in 1985, and was founded by a man, the agricultural minister at the time, who truly understood the needs of animals and created a very good capybara enclosure, much larger than the current enclosure. The current management of the Bio Park make no effort to educate the visitors about the species so Japanese visitors are not knowledgeable enough to understand the needs of the capybaras.

Aoba born 2014. Mother Momiji, father Toku.

Butter and Cookie born 2014. Mother Maple, father Toku.

Fujiko had 4 pups: Hinase, Ayu and Kin and Gin who were born on 2012.

Hinase was born in April 2010. Her mother was Donguri’s daughter, Fujiko, her father was Takeshi.

Hinase had 4 pups on 2 March 2014. Their father was Toku. One male, Ricki who died in mysterious circumstances. And 3 females: Ryoko, Sumere and Keiko. Sumere was sent to China which was heartbreaking as zoos in China have a very bad reputation. Sumere had been taken away for the day as part of the travelling zoo and when she returned that evening she was attacked by other capybaras who assumed she had been given some privilege. Of course, being taken away from your herd as part of a travelling zoo is extremely stressful for any capybara. Keiko recently had to be separated because she was being attacked. Ryoko had to be separated after suffering a partial miscarriage which led to a cesarean (C-section) after which she did not eat for two weeks and became very weak. When she was put back in the herd she was attacked because she had become so weak and had to be separated.

Choco and Donut, born 2013. Mother Momiji, father Toku.

Macaroni born 2013. Mother Ayu, father Toku. Macaroni and Ayu now live at Nagasaki Bio Park’s sister zoo in Fukuoka, Torius Zoo.

Maple’s babies, Whip, Cream, Syrup, Milk, Prune born 2016. Toku was the father.

Ayu born 2011. Her mother was Fujiko and her father was Yasushi.

Ryoko’s male pup, Ryosuke, born 2018. Ryosuke was the only survivor of Ryoko’s 3 pups born by cesarean. Kona was his father.

Yasushi was the breeding male for 3 years up until the end of 2012 which was the first year we visited. Yasushi was the last breeding male who was able to live with the herd. Born 2007 – died 2013. As you might imagine, he was the centre of attention. At that time there were only female capybaras in the herd, together with the breeding male.

Toku was the next breeding male for 4 years. He was kept in a separate enclosure. Toku was a highly intelligent capybara and passed this intelligence on to some of his pups including Ryoko, Choco and Aoba. Toku had a prolapsed penis, probably due to the stress of separation and being surrounded by females who he could not be with. Probably his penis was “out” for too much of the time due to his very frustrating situation. This often leads to a prolapsed penis. Apparently another Biopark male capybara also had a prolapsed penis; I believe this was Kenta, who may have been blind due to inbreeding and who lived in the backyard area of Nagasaki Bio Park until he went to a sister zoo, Mongol Village, and lived in an enclosure with Kin.

Kona is the current breeding male since 2017. Kona is exceptionally friendly and loves to be petted. He was born at Nasu Animal Kingdom, mother and father Salt and Pepper. Kona then went to a petting zoo in Osaka before coming to Nagasaki Bio Park. Tragically Marc and I are the only people who pet Kona because he is in a separate enclosure. I asked the Bio Park to ask the capybara keepers to pet him but for some reason this did not happen. Perhaps they are trying to break Kona’s spirit. I asked if a rope could be placed with instructions so that the visitors could pet Kona. The rope was created but without any instructions so the visitors did not know what it was for. As soon as we left Japan this rope construction was removed!

 

Capybaras Are Much More Intelligent Than People Realise; Watch How Tuff’n Solves His Problemカピバラは非常にインテリジェントに問題を解決します水豚非常聰明地解決了問題

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lqw9NaZqTgU

The Importance of Colostrum For Newborn Animals

Colostrum is the thick, yellowish coloured milk the mother animal produces immediately after she gives birth (parturition) and which is produced by all mammals. It provides the antibodies the newborn animal needs to protect him from infection until his immune system is sufficiently developed to be able to create its own antibodies. Without these antibodies from colostrum, babies may become sick or even die.

Momiji nurses Choco, Donut and Macaroni who are six weeks old

The immune system of newborn animals has not yet developed meaning they have no antibodies (immunoglobulin) of their own to protect them against disease, bacteria and viral infections. The colostrum in the mother’s milk provides these antibodies and contains the antibodies from every infection the mother has been exposed to over the course of her lifetime. In this way the mother’s immunity is transferred to the newborn via the colostrum. The mother’s milk is richest in colostrum when she gives birth so it is very important that the newborn animal should drink this as soon as possible, and within 3 – 6 hours of birth. The concentration of antibodies declines significantly over the first 12 – 24 hours. After three to five days the mother’s milk no longer contains any colostrum. It may also be important that the mother stays in the same place where she will give birth for 14 days prior to giving birth, in order that she can develop antibodies against any pathogens in the birth environment.

There is another reason why It is vitally important that the newborn animal suckles as soon as possible after birth. Mammals are born with a special ability to absorb the antibodies in the colostrum directly into the bloodstream. Known as passive immunity transfer, this is the most efficient way of ensuring that the antibodies are spread throughout the body of the newborn animal. The antibodies pass through the lining of the stomach, the intestinal wall, directly into the bloodstream. However, this ability only lasts for a very short time, the first 24 – 36 hours of his life. This passive immunity transfer is at its most efficient during the first few hours after birth. Passive immunity transfer ensures that the antibodies , which are large protein molecules, are able to be absorbed intact and enter directly into the bloodstream without destroying the structure of the molecules, which is important as the structure of an antibody is integral to its function. Research suggests that after 6 hours the intestinal wall is already beginning to close and by 12 hours the ability to absorb the antibodies directly into the bloodstream has already declined by about 50%. After 24 hours, some say 36 hours, antibodies can no longer be absorbed directly into the bloodstream. After this period the antibody proteins are digested in the normal way in the intestine, and turned into amino acids before being absorbed. These antibodies can still offer protection, but only locally in the intestine.

Macaroni did not get much colostrum because his mother, Ayu, did not produce any milk

Antibodies identify and bind to specific pathogens. They then signal to the animal’s immune system to destroy the invading pathogen. Because baby mammals are born without antibodies they are very susceptible to disease. The young animal may be exposed to pathogens in their environment including from the mother’s nipple or unclean feeding bottles. These pathogens, bacteria and viruses, travel to the intestine where they attach to the intestinal wall and reproduce. They may destroy intestinal cells, causing upset to the metabolism, malnourishment, leakage of cell contents into the intestinal lumen, maldigestion, osmotic upset and ultimately diarrhoea. Many pathogens are found in the intestine so for the antibodies to be effective against these they must move from the blood back into the intestine and attach to the pathogen.

Colostrum also provides the energy needed for a newborn to maintain body temperature and survive especially in cold environments. Newborn animals have low reserves of vitamins and minerals and colostrum is rich in these. Selenium, copper and zinc are minerals which are essential for good immune function. Newborn pups are very dependent on copper acquired through the mother’s umbilical cord as copper levels in milk are low. The iron content may be as much at seventeen times higher in colostrum than normal milk. Colostrum also has laxative properties which help to stimulate the passage of faecal matter through the newborn animals digestive tract.

The quality of the colostrum which the mother produces will depend on her age, older mothers produce better quality colostrum than mothers giving birth for the first time. It is also essential that the mother gets the necessary nutrition, especially during the later stages of her pregnancy, in order to mount the immune response needed to create antibodies in her colostrum and for her own health. Without adequate nutrition the mother may produce less colostrum and colostrum which is of poorer quality.

The amount of colostrum the newborns receive depends on a number of factors including the position of the teat on which the baby is suckling. With capybara pups and piglets the teats closest to the animals front legs, the anterior, provide a greater amount of colostrum compared to the teats at the rear of the animal, the posterior. The strongest, largest pups tend to drink at these anterior teats. However, all teats provide sufficient antibodies to protect the newborn. Animals who are born later in the birthing process, and animals who have a lower weight at birth, also receive less colostrum, perhaps because they were suckling at the posterior teats, but will still receive enough to get the antibodies they need.

Research on mother pigs suggest that the colostrum is not released continuously, but rather in “discrete ejections”.

http://animalstudiesrepository.org/feebeh/4/

Newborn animals who do not receive colostrum can survive but are more susceptible to diarrhoea and pneumonia. In the absence of colostrum from the mother’s milk a colostrum substitute can be used. You should be aware of the difference between a “colostrum supplement” and a “colostrum substitute”. A colostrum supplement does not contain the antibodies which a newborn animal requires. In America, USDA’s Centre for Veterinary Biologics regulates the immunoglobulin content of colostrum products. The product must raise the concentration of serum immunoglobulin, i.e. the amount of antibodies in the blood, above 10 mg/mL. Many of these products are based on bovine serum which contains at least 100 g of immunoglobulin per litre. These products also include fat, protein, vitamins and minerals.

If you are using a colostrum substitute this should be fed as soon as possible after birth when the antibodies will be absorbed most efficiently by passive immunity transfer. The colostrum substitute should be fed during the first 6 hours, and can be fed on demand. Some sources recommend feeding at 3 to 4 hour intervals for the first 24 hours of the animal’s life, although the efficiency with which the colestrum is absorbed will decline as the hours pass. The colostrum substitute should be fed at blood temperature at a ratio of about 10% of the animal’s body weight. A 60 mL syringe holds 2 ounces of colostrum.

The mother’s colostrum can be stored in a refrigerator for one week before quality and the concentration of antibodies declines. If you have extra colostrum that you are able to freeze, it should be frozen in small quantities, perhaps using an ice tray which ensures that small quantities can be removed as required. Frozen colostrum must be thawed slowly so as not to destroy the antibodies. Use a bowl of warm water to thaw the frozen colostrum slowly, do not thaw it in a microwave. Once defrosted it cannot be refrozen. Frozen colostrum can be stored for up to 12 months.

Thus there are two factors which influence the antibodies which a newborn will receive, and both are only available for a short time period. One is the amount of the colostrum in the mother’s milk, and the other is the ability of the newborn pup to absorb these antibodies directly into the bloodstream. Therefore it is very important that a newborn animal drinks his mother’s colostrum rich milk as soon as possible after birth and within six hours.

My interest in colostrum came about because Macaroni, who was born at Nagasaki Bio Park, did not receive any colostrum from his mother, Ayu, as she did not produce any milk. Macaroni was put in with Momiji who had given birth to Choco and Donut three days before Macaroni was born. Although Macaroni was a normal-sized pup for the first few weeks of his life, when we met up again a year later he was very small and very thin. He may have received a very small amount of colostrum from Momiji but not enough to ensure his normal development. However, I was told that Macaroni would achieve a normal lifespan which proved to be the case.

Capybara pups are born precocial which means they are able to eat normal food almost as soon as they are born. Zabon’s pups, Nadeshiko, Kikyo and Sasuke all took great interest in the vegetables that had been put on the food trough in their enclosure for their mother, Zabon, within a few hours of their birth. They took the vegetables in their mouths and chewed and appeared to be eating the vegetables.

Capybaras Are Not Fussy Eaters

70% of the capybara diet in the wild consists of grasses and sedges.

Capybaras in Uruguay

Pet capybaras only become fussy eaters if the people they live with feed them inappropriate and potentially dangerous food. It is surprising how many people feed their pets junk food, crackers, peanuts and human snacks all of which should not be fed to a capybara.

As one friend of mine who lived with two capybaras advises: “if you introduce food which is bad for a capybara, but which they might enjoy, you may find it difficult to get your capybara to eat the food that is essential for his health because it may not seem as tasty”.

 Capybaras will happily eat grass all day, as they do in the wild.

The capybaras at Nagasaki Bio Park are fed cabbage, pumpkin and carrots. Their preference is for the cabbage but they happily eat all the vegetables. Visitors buy bamboo to feed them and the capybaras love bamboo.

These Biopark capybaras would love to be able to eat grass. They sit by the entrance to their enclosure trying to escape to eat the grass which grows just outside their enclosure. Before the handles were changed on the gates, Choco and Ryoko were able to open the gates and several of the herd regularly escaped to eat the grass.

Zoos in Europe always keep capybaras in large grass filled enclosures where capybaras can graze all day at will.

You should never feed sweet foods to a capybara. Capybaras cannot digest sugar. This causes fermentation in the digestive tract which creates wind and is very painful. As the leading breeder of capybaras has written, you should only occasionally give a capybara fruit. Some experts warn against too much sweetcorn or carrots.

Feeding a capybara the wrong food may cause bloat which can lead to death.

A capybara keeper at Nagasaki Bio Park was horrified when I told him that some people in America feed peanuts to their pet capybaras.

Capybaras have hypsodont teeth which continually grow and need to be kept in check by chewing. Many pet capybaras die prematurely as a result of tooth problems mainly caused by the wrong diet. In their natural habitat the capybara diet consists of coarse grasses, aquatic plants and the bark of trees and bushes. This is a low nutrient, high fibre diet and requires capybaras to graze for long periods of the day to get the nutrition they need. This grazing is essential for a capybara’s teeth.

In their natural habitat capybaras spend 31% of the day grazing during the wet season when there is an abundance of nutritious vegetation, and 42% of the day grazing during the dry season, when the grasses are less nutritious. So you can see why chewing for extended periods of time is a natural capybara behaviour which they must be able to exhibit. Many pet capybaras do not have the opportunity to chew on healthy food for extended periods of the day and this leads to tooth problems. Where capybaras have a choice of grass or hay they always prefer grass.

Many pet capybaras chew on furnishings to satisfy this need to keep their teeth healthy by chewing. My friends put a bale of hay in the living room so if the capybaras were hungry or wanted to chew on something healthy they had hay. The smell of the hay in the living room was fantastic! Quite apart from having the hay to eat, the capybaras loved to sit on the soft bales of hay to rest. As babies they looked so cute when they fell asleep on their bed of hay.

Capybaras seem to instinctively understand that they have a need to chew. They seem to sense if their teeth need attention, perhaps because they become painful.

At Nagasaki Bio Park the capybaras chew on stones. There were times when Donguri refused my offer of bamboo because she had a need to chew on a stone. Sometimes she would gnaw at the ground trying to pull a stone free from the earth. I kept a supply of suitably hard stones to give her whenever I saw her behaving as if she needed to chew. Nowadays, the capybaras are given branches so they can gnaw on the bark which keeps their teeth healthy and the bark is also nutritious.

A person who runs a highly respected Animal Refuge told me that one pet capybara “owner” even fed her capybara “a dollop of TOOTHPASTE daily because he loved it”! He explained to me that “toothpaste contains fluoride which is a toxin and is used in rodent killer products”!

Books For People Who Love Animals

Anyone with a love of animals will find these books interesting and very rewarding, if you have not already read them. All these books are full of illuminating, entertaining and valuable anecdotes which are a delight to read and which will broaden your understanding of animals.

As eminent cognitive ethologist Marc Bekoff says: “it is because animals have emotions that we are so drawn to them. Lacking a shared language, emotions are perhaps our most effective means of cross species communication. Animal emotions are a matter of importance in their own right, but the very presence of animals, with their free-flowing emotions and empathy, is critical to human well-being.”

Animals should be treated with love and respect, and people should try to see things from the animals’ perspective. Every animal is an individual whose life is important to him or her. Now that capybaras have become so popular people tend to use them to satisfy human needs, often at the expense of the capybara’s needs. Animals are not entertainment. It shouldn’t take much imagination to understand that a “capybara cafe” is no place for a capybara.

Aoba would make such a good mother. Zabon’s babies loved Aoba

I have put other people’s reviews of these books in quotes:

Carl Safina Beyond Words. What Animals Think and Feel. Beautifully written with fascinating anecdotes about animals and their behaviour, some of which will bring tears to your eyes.

“Beyond Words brings forth powerful and illuminating insight into the unique personalities of animals through extraordinary stories of animal joy, grief, jealousy, anger and love. The similarity between human and nonhuman consciousness, self-awareness and empathy calls us to re-evaluate how we interact with animals as Safina thoughtfully tackles issues that affect us all. Wise, passionate and eye-opening at every turn.”  “Beyond Words is a must – read. Animals think, mourn, dream, make plans and communicate complex messages in much the same way as we do.” “Beyond Words Is such a beautiful book, deep and tender, and will make you stay up all night. Carl Safina has a rare gift for imparting scientific insight with a storyteller’s grace, and he writes with great knowledge and compassion. This vivid, far ranging and compassionate work is destined to become a classic”.

Marc Bekoff: Minding Animals – Awareness, Emotions and Heart. My Bible when it comes to understanding animals and their behaviour. Filled with Bekoff’s light humour and touching stories of animal behaviour. This book tells you everything you need to know about animals, and ethology, the study of animal behaviour, with guidelines on how you can set up your own research projects to learn more about the animals you live with or encounter. If anyone thinks it is acceptable to put capybaras in dresses or other clothing, this book explains why it is insulting and simply wrong.

Marc Bekoff: The Emotional Lives of Animals. “Based on award-winning scientist Marc Bekoff’s years of experience, this important book shows that animals have rich emotional lives… full of extraordinary stories of animal joy, empathy, grief, embarrassment and anger and love, confirmed by the latest scientific research”. Marc Bekoff writes in his preface to this book: “Welcome to the fascinating world of animal emotions. I love what I do as a scientist who has studied animal behaviour for more than 30 years. I love learning about animals.” Bekoff also explores the evolution of emotions with reference to evolutionary continuity among all mammal species, resulting in brain structures and neurochemicals, shared by humans and animals, that are important in processing emotions. In her forward to this book, Jane Goodall writes: “I am very pleased to be writing a foreword for this important book, for it deals with a subject – animal emotions – that is crucial to a proper understanding of animals and their relationship to ourselves. I watched them, learned from them and love them. The more people understand that animals have rich emotional lives and, above all, are capable of suffering – mentally as well as physically – the sooner we may succeed in changing the inappropriate ways in which so many millions of animals are treated.” This is another book I constantly refer to and quote from.

Jonathan Balcombe: Pleasurable Kingdom. Animals and The Nature of Feeling Good. This book has become a classic. For far too long the very idea that animals had emotions was dismissed by scientists even though this went against the teachings of Charles Darwin. “Pleasurable Kingdom is the first book to focus on evidence that animals, like humans, enjoy themselves. It debunks the popular perception that life for most is a continuous, grim struggle for survival. Instead it suggests that animals may feel good thanks to play, sex, touch, food, anticipation, comfort, aesthetics and more. Combining amusing anecdotes and rigourous evidence, Doctor Jonathan Balcombe proposes that evolution favours sensory rewards because they drive living beings to stay alive and reproduce”. “This impressive book takes the reader on a journey into the inner lives of animals that inspires respect and appreciation for all creatures … Animals are individual beings with a wide range of emotions and feelings…”

Jonathan Balcombe: Second Nature. The Inner Lives of Animals. “If you care at all about animals, this book is a must – read. Second Nature will astonish and fascinate you, and leave you a wiser and more compassionate person. I wish I could have read this book 20 years ago. It would have changed my life. Maybe it will change yours”, writes Jeffrey Masson, co-author of When Elephants Weep.Second Nature‘s rich treatment of animal awareness, cognition, emotion, perception and virtue provides the foundation for Balcombe’s powerful core argument: that we humans can do better, that we must do better, by the other inhabitants of Planet Earth.” “New scientific studies of animal behaviour reveal perceptions, intelligences, awareness and social skills that would have been deemed fantasy a generation ago. These implications add a moral depth to our troubled relationship with animals. Did you know that rats practice random acts of kindness and that dogs recognise unfairness?”

Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson and Susan McCarthy: When Elephants Weep. The Emotional Lives of Animals. “A masterpiece, the most comprehensive and compelling argument for animal sensibility that I’ve seen”. Jane Goodall writes: “This is not only an important book, it’s marvellous! If animals could read they would be filled with joy and gratitude to the authors, as I am. Please read it”. “… Is sprinkled with insight… creates a riveting and revolutionary portrayal of animals’ lives that will permanently change and enrich the way you look at animals”.

Cynthia Moss and photographer Martyn Colbeck: Echo of the Elephants. The Story of an Elephant Family. “This book is a unique and fascinating insight into the life of one elephant family in Ambroseli National Park in Kenya, led by the wise and resourceful matriarch of the family, Echo. The personalities of the individual elephants emerge over the course of the 18 months which Cynthia Moss spent learning about the complex rules and customs that govern elephant behaviour.”

Alexandra Morton: Listening to Whales. What the Orcas Have Taught Us. “An inspiring story of a woman’s determination to live her life on her own terms, and a fascinating study of the profound communion between humans and whales”. Her groundbreaking work has opened the world of these supersmart cetaceans. “To us the undersea world is a dark, impenetrable place; to whales each call illuminates it in three-dimensional flashes of detail. Vision doesn’t penetrate most surfaces, but sound does. Echolocation is like running your hands over your lover’s face in the dark. You can’t see the details, but your sense of touch fills in the gaps.”

Capybara Diet. Includes Treatments For Dietary Health Issues. 水豚飲食. カピバラダイエット

The correct diet is very important for the health, welfare and longevity of a capybara.

Includes details of Critical Care Formula for capybaras, Probiotic treatments for capybaras and details of Milk Formula specifically formulated for baby capybaras

The capybara digestive system evolved over 30 million years to take advantage of a diet that was high in fibre and low in calories. If you want your capybara to live a long and healthy life you should try to replicate this diet as closely as possible.

Sugar and Stress are two of the most potentially life-threatening causal factors a pet capybara can encounter. Capybaras should not be given anything with sugar in it like candy, ice cream, sweetened yoghurt, ice lollies etc. Neither should they be given junk food. This seems like common sense but it is surprising how many people, out of ignorance, will feed their pets whatever junk food they are eating. In addition, Exotic Animal Vets warn about the potential harm in feeding the naturally occuring ‘sugar’ in sweet vegetables and fruit, specifically mentioning sweetcorn because of the high sugar content, so you can imagine how disastrous any food with added sugar would be.

Please be aware: There are 2 famous capybara owners who do everything in their power to persuade people not to go to my blogs. It is believed that they view me as a threat because of my knowledge of capybaras. It is tragic that there are people who put their own egos above the welfare of these fabulous animals.

If anyone tells you that they do not support Capybara World you can be sure that they view me as a threat because my information is well researched.

A leading breeder of wild animals, Kapi’yva Exotics, posts this information on their website: “I DO NOT recommend feeding fruits, vegetables or other items containing large amounts of sugar on a daily basis. There is some evidence that diets containing large amounts of sugar, even from healthy sources, can cause liver and heart problems.” Kapi’yva Exotics no longer sells capybaras as pets because too many pet capybaras suffer, they only sell to zoos.

Animals do not have the same tolerance for unnatural feed that humans have. This is especially true in the case of a capybara, whose digestive system is exceptionally sensitive, and has been described by at least one expert as the ‘weak link’ in terms of capybara health. I know of several capybaras who died prematurely, in one case after only a few months, because of diet.

This is the perfect enclosure for a capybara: lots of grass and a large pond. Photo by Martin MurmelTier Hees

The healthiest pet capybaras that I have met are fed a diet of fresh untreated grass, hay (Orchard Hay and Timothy Hay), palm fronds to chew on and guinea pig feed.

Put simply:  DO NOT FEED YOUR CAPYBARA ANYTHING WITH ADDED SUGAR AND ABSOLUTELY NO CANDY or  JUNK FOOD; or  SWEET FRUIT or Bird seed. In the Tropics; capybaras spend 31% of their time grazing during the wet season; and 42% in the dry season.

The olive shaped, green, separated droppings  are a sign of a healthy capybara in the wild.  Softer, sausage shaped faeces may indicate that the capybara is being fed the wrong diet. Fruit, carrots, sweet corn etc may be responsible.

Please also see this blog for information about plants, chemicals and other potentially lethal dangers that capybaras may encounter:


https://capybaraworld.wordpress.com/2014/06/29/capybaras-beware-of-toxic-plants-chemicals-and-poisonous-animals-like-scorpions-and-snakes-humans-remove-these-from-your-land-garden-and-yard-%e3%82%ab%e3%83%94%e3%83%90%e3%83%a9%e3%81%ab/

Keep some hay or a bale of hay in the living room so your capybara always has something to eat and chew on. Capybaras have evolved to spend at least 31% of their day chewing (on high fibre, coarse food like grasses) in order to keep their teeth healthy. Hay adds a beautiful aroma to the smell of a living room.

Romeo never chews on furnishings or plastic because he always has hay to eat in the house

Romeo Never Chews Pillowcases or Plastic, if he wants something to chew on he goes to his Bale of Hay in the living room

HEALTHY TEETH:  To avoid your pet capybara ending up with very painful, life threatening (not to mention expensive) tooth problems, it is essential to include a lot of coarse grazing in a capybara diet.  Unlimited Fresh grass should be a staple part of every capybara diet.  Hay that is of lower nutrition is more suitable for a capybara’s digestive system and means they will eat more, which equates to more fiber and more tooth wear. The coarseness of the hay keeps their teeth ground down and healthy. This need to keep their teeth healthy should never, ever be underestimated. It is very important for capybara teeth to be kept in check, as the teeth would be in the wild grazing on coarse grasses. I have seen capybaras chewing on twigs, bark and stones as a method of self-help dentistry. Capybaras may grind their teeth when they sleep, which also helps keep their teeth in check.

The Hay and Guinea pig feed should be available 24/7.

Capybaras I know have some Orchard/Timothy hay mix in the living room. Whenever the capybaras want to chew on something, or they feel hungry, they go to the hay (or guinea pig feed). This means they do not chew pillowcases, plastic, comforters or any other inappropriate items of furniture. Swallowing plastic is potentially very dangerous.

The best treatment for diarrhoea is a probiotic. In America this probiotic is called Benebac. In Japan, zoos use a probiotic called Bio 3. This probiotic could be a lifesaver.

Bene-bac

Many people with capybaras and guinea pigs believe the probiotic ‘Bene-bac’ is a lifesaver. Some friends use it whenever the capybara’s poos become softer and sausage shaped, rather than the encapsulated, olive shaped faeces which capybaras living in their natural habitat pass. Bene-Bac Small Animal Powder is a concentrated live culture of four common digestive bacteria found in the intestinal tracts of mammals. Bene-Bac is recommended any time an animal experiences stress from changing nutritional or environmental conditions. Contains 20 million CFU per gram of viable lactic acid producing bacteria. Powder formula is easy to mix with water.   It comes in 4 different types – the Bene-bac designed for guinea pigs is the correct one to use.

Constipation: Bene-bac can also be used to treat constipation. It is important to ensure your capybara drinks enough water and has access to fresh water to drink 24 hours a day. A healthy diet of unrestricted access to fresh grass should ensure a capybara does not become constipated. Chewing coarse grasses is essential for the health of capybara teeth. You should always consult your vet as soon as you become concerned.

Bene-bac Product Information

Bene-Bac® Plus Small Animal Powder is recommended any time an animal experiences changing nutritional or environmental conditions.

  • Contains seven fat-encapsulated, common microorganisms found in intestinal tract of small mammals
  • Provides help for changing conditions, including, but not limited to birth, breeding, post-surgery, antibiotic therapy, weaning, worming, showing, boarding and travel
  • Guaranteed 20 million colony-forming units (CFU) of viable bacteria per gram
  • Recommended as part of the management program for all animals subjected to adverse conditions
  • May be used for regular maintenance

https://www.petag.com/products/bene-bac-plus-small-animal-powder

Critical Care Formula for Capybaras. Capybara Health Care. This Formula Could Save the Life of Your Capybara.

If you have a capybara who is not eating properly, or becoming very thin, this nutritional formula made by Oxbow, Critical Care for Herbivores, is recommended by a vet who specialises in treating capybaras. Your capybara may have tooth problems (which will need to be attended to) which makes chewing painful, or he might have an illness, or be recovering from surgery. This product has everything a capybara needs for optimum nutrition and health and recovery.

Remember that if your capybara has not been eating very much, his stomach will have shrunk. This means he will only be able to eat small quantities of food at any one time. You will need to keep offering him this formula, in small quantities, throughout the day to ensure he gets adequate nutrition.

Critical Care for Herbivores is a high protein, high energy, high fibre, easily digested powdered formula, with all the essential vitamins and minerals.. It is designed to be palatable so that your capybara enjoys it and wants to eat. It contains high-fibre Timothy hay to support proper gut physiology and digestion. It comes as a powder to be mixed with liquid.

A Critical Care Formula in the form of a crunchy “biscuit”, is also available, and chewing it will be good for your capybara’s teeth.

For more information please see the link below:

            Excessive mucus in faeces may be a sign of a bacterial infection, a blockage or tumours. The gut and intestines rely on a certain amount of mucus to function normally. Excessive amounts of mucus could indicate a blockage. This could be caused by anything from a foreign body to a bad diet with not enough roughage to keep the tract moving. Dehydration and constipation can also cause an increase in mucus. You should definitely consult your vet.

A constant intake of high fibre, low calorie grazing, grass or hay, is essential to keep the capybara’s intestinal tracts from slowing and going into stasis. Fruit might cause fermentation in the gut which can lead to bloat. In guinea pigs this is a big killer and often very hard to reverse. Fluids, fibre and lots of grass can be used to treat this.

A leading rodentologist in Britain recommends a sheep wormer, or genetically similar product, be used on guinea pigs and grazing animals for digestive health.

The U.S. Navy, the US Police Force and the best animal trainers do not use food as a reward. In the words of one US naval dog trainer “food complicates training”. Capybaras are highly intelligent. In the opinion of many capybara owners they are at least as intelligent as the most intelligent dogs. They are also highly sophisticated emotionally; i.e. they have high emotional intelligence. They respond very well to praise, and are very sensitive to the tone of voice, with a surprisingly large vocabulary. Instead of using food as a reward, use praise, such as “Good Boy together with the capybaras name”. The capybara will swell up with pride. This is far more rewarding to him than a sweet toxic food treat.

A new study suggests that most dogs respond more positively to praise than to food.

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/08/dogs-would-rather-get-belly-rub-treat?utm_source=newsfromscience&utm_medium=facebook-text&utm_campaign=wantatreat-6517

One danger with giving capybaras inappropriate food treats is that they may soon only do what you want in return for a treat. If it is a high energy treat they may no longer eat the copious amounts of grass and hay that they need to maintain a healthy digestive system.

Capybaras are highly emotional animals and do not react well to stress, which can lead to digestive problems. In the wild capybaras have the support of the herd, and close proximity to other herd members, for their emotional well-being. I have never met a pet capybara who is bonded with humans who did not suffer. Every time the human, with whom the pet is bonded, leaves the home the capybara suffers acute separation anxiety. This is something I have witnessed many times and it is absolutely heartbreaking. The light goes out in the capybara’s eyes as the human he loves disappears out of view. The capybara will sit for a long time facing in the direction his loved one departed in. The capybara may sit by the entrance gate or front door waiting for his beloved human to return, and call and call.

A capybara bonded with a human will view this human as a herd member. This reaction to separation and the disappearance of a herd member probably reflects 30 million years of evolution wherein a lone capybara, abandoned by the herd or separated from it, would have little chance of survival.   If you are going to live with a pet capybara it would be kinder to let the capybara bond with another animal who will remain at home all day with the capybara, rather than have him/her bond with you and suffer everytime you have to go out (to work, shopping etc).  A Mara or a calm dog such as a labrador or border collie might be the ideal companion.

Milk Formula For Baby Capybaras: Wombaroo Capybara Milk Replacer

This is the only milk formula specifically formulated for baby capybaras. It has a higher protein content and fat content than other milk formulas for most other species. It comes from Australia.

https://wombaroo.com/shop/ols/products/wombaroo-capybara-milk-replacer-2kg

DIRECTIONS FOR USE: To make 1 litre of milk mix 190g of powder with 870ml of preboiled warm water. Add about half of the water first, mix to a paste then make up to 1 litre with remaining water and mix thoroughly. An electric whisk can be used for mixing.

Feed Impact Colostrum Supplement to new-borns who did not receivesufficient maternalcolostrum.

GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT of capybara pups: Typical birth weight is 1.5 – 2.0 kg. Average daily weight gain is about 50-100g per day until weaning at 3 months (approx. 8kg body weight)3.

(for further information about Wombaroo Baby Capybara Milk Replacer, see the end of this blog)

Rodents are addicted to sugar and sweet foods (more so than cocaine!). This is another reason I would be very careful about introducing anything sweet into a capybara’s diet as this can lead to the capybara becoming curious about other unhealthy foods which he/she had never shown any interest in before.

This is the information Kapi’yva Exotics, a leading breeder of exotic animals, provides for capybara diet on its website:

“Capybaras are true herbivores, their diet in the wild consists almost exclusively of various grasses. In captivity, their diet should consist primarily of guinea pig or livestock feed and plenty of fresh grass or hay. Capybaras do not naturally produce adequate amounts of vitamin C and they can develop scurvy as a result of vitamin C deficiencies. In the wild the large amounts of fresh grass they consume provides the extra vitamin C they need. In captivity, their diet must contain either plenty of fresh grass for grazing or a vitamin C supplement. Most commercial guinea pig diets will contain a vitamin C supplement but these can be very costly if you are feeding multiple adult capybaras. Mazuri and LabDiet guinea pig formulas are available in 25lb and 50lb bags and can be found at, or specially ordered at most feed stores. A much cheaper alternative is livestock or rabbit feed. If used as a staple diet extra vitamin C should be added. The easiest method I’ve found of doing this is to dust or mix their feed with ascorbic acid powder.

I DO NOT recommend feeding fruits, vegetables or other items containing large amounts of sugar on a daily basis. There is some evidence that diets containing large amounts of sugar, even from healthy sources, can cause liver and heart problems.

They have evolved as grazers, feeding primarily grass/hay and guinea pig feed is the best way to mimic their natural diet.”

Some people give horse feed instead of guinea pig pellets primarily for reasons of cost. It is important to read the ingredients of any formula feed as this will dictate your choice.   As horses are considered more valuable than cattle, horse feed is likely to be made of more high-quality ingredients.”

Below I include some information on what not to feed and why. The information comes from exotic pet vets and experienced capybara owners who have done a great deal of research.

Grazing on Unknown Grass: One capybara owner wrote: “We are very cautious about feeding unknown grass. Our rule of thumb, is that if it’s long and neglected, we’ll try it. If it looks too well taken care of, we fear poisons and leave it. It is more likely that fertilisers and weedkillers will be applied to well cared for grass. You also have to always check grass for toxic weeds. We have nightshade in this area. I don’t even know if they would actually eat it, but I’m very cautious.  Water effects fertilizers, but that would not be my main concern. I worry about insecticides and herbicides, which are usually designed to have residual effects that erode over time, not by water.”

Alfalfa:  An exotic pet vet at a leading university veterinary school is quoted as saying ” Absolutely no alfalfa, it is too rich.”  It may also be too high in calcium.

Calcium:  “There may be a concern about too much calcium for rodents and animals who extract extra nutrients through hindgut fermentation, this includes capybaras. There may be a risk of bladder stones or grit from excess calcium. Here’s a hay chart on calcium levels: http://www.guinealynx.info/hay_calcium.html “.

Vegetables:  The Capybaras at Nagasaki Bio Park, some of whom lived to a ripe old age, at least 13 years, were fed vegetables in season. When I was there it was cabbage, carrots and pumpkin. The capybaras at the Bio Park who eat the most carrots do not produce healthy olive shaped faeces. The faeces associated with parents is soft, barely even sausage shaped.   One capybara owner had this to say about carrots: “I have read online that the sugar level in carrots is on a par with apples and that because of the fat soluble vitamin A, if fed too much (or in a combination with other sources like alfalfa) the vitamin A can build up to toxic levels. She feeds one carrot a day.”

Sweetcorn: every Exotic Pet Vet with experience of capybaras was unanimous in saying you should not feed sweetcorn to capybaras. It is far too sweet.

I would remove all seeds and berries from my garden/yard as soon as they fall from trees.

Below is some information taken from research done on capybaras in the wild in South America:

This excellent book, see link below, is a collection of research papers on capybara, unfortunately finance for research comes from the agricultural industry so that is the primary focus of the research, but there is still a lot of very useful information:

http://www.springer.com/life+sciences/ecology/book/978-1-4614-3999-8

The capybara, Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, is a herbivorous semi aquatic mammal that grazes near water. A number of physiological and morphological adaptations of the capybaras digestive system allowed this species to meet its energy requirements from a diet with a high fibre and low nutritional content and silica deposits.

These highly fibrous diet components are extremely difficult to digest, therefore herbivores possess specific adaptations for the digestion of these materials. The best known and most common adaptation to a high fibre diet among mammals is fermentation by symbionts (by bacteria and fungi and protozoa), coupled with mechanisms for the digestion and absorption of the products of fermentation. Among mammals there are two distinct types of symbiotic digestion where fermentation occurs. 1) foregut fermentation, as found in cows, and 2) hindgut fermentation as found in rodents.

Hindgut fermenters use the cecum, located between the small and large intestines, as a fermentation chamber, which precludes regurgitation and re-swallowing the fermented plants as a strategy for the absorption of nutrients. In the case of the capybara the process of cecotrophy allows a daily cycle of feeding and reingestion: food goes once along the digestive tract, entering the cecum where it is fermented and then excreted. These excreted products are taken directly from the anus by the herbivore and they pass one more time through the entire digestive tract.  The waste products bypass the cecum and move onto the large intestine, where hard dry faeces are excreted (but not reabsorbed this time). The two processes occur within a 24 hour cycle. It has been argued that, since hindgut fermenters can take advantage of any available directly digestible (i.e. non-fibre) nutrients before the bacterial fermentation takes place, they are more efficient at extracting nutrients from food than foregut fermenters.

The capybara diet, in the wild, consists mainly of grasses, aquatic grasses with varying a portion of sedges and just a few other plants. Capybaras gnaw on the bark of bushes and trees. Bark is nutritious and keeps their teeth healthy and in check.

During the wet season when plants are more abundant, capybaras are more selective and spend more time grazing on Hymenachne amplexicaulis, an aquatic grass of high caloric and low fibre content, then on less palatable reeds.

Capybaras are considered predominately diurnal, however groups have been observed grazing during the night.

In the tropics, capybaras spend 31% of their time grazing during the wet season, and 42% in the dry season.

The 3 products below could be life-saving for your capybara:

1. Critical Care Formula for Capybaras. Capybara Health Care. This Formula Could Save the Life of Your Capybara.

If you have a capybara who is not eating properly, or becoming very thin, this nutritional formula made by Oxbow, Critical Care for Herbivores, is recommended by a vet who specialises in treating capybaras. Your capybara may have tooth problems (which will need to be attended to) which makes chewing painful, or he might have an illness, or be recovering from surgery. This product has everything a capybara needs for optimum nutrition and health and recovery.

Remember that if your capybara has not been eating very much, his stomach will have shrunk. This means he will only be able to eat small quantities of food at any one time. You will need to keep offering him this formula, in small quantities, throughout the day to ensure he gets adequate nutrition.

Critical Care for Herbivores is a high protein, high energy, high fibre, easily digested powdered formula, with all the essential vitamins and minerals.. It is designed to be palatable so that your capybara enjoys it and wants to eat. It contains high-fibre Timothy hay to support proper gut physiology and digestion. It comes as a powder to be mixed with liquid.

A Critical Care Formula in the form of a crunchy “biscuit”, is also available, and chewing it will be good for your capybara’s teeth.

For more information please see the link below:

2. Bene-bac

Many people with capybaras and guinea pigs believe the probiotic ‘Bene-bac’ is a lifesaver. Some friends use it whenever the capybara’s poos become softer and sausage shaped, rather than the encapsulated, olive shaped faeces which capybaras living in their natural habitat pass. Bene-Bac Small Animal Powder is a concentrated live culture of four common digestive bacteria found in the intestinal tracts of mammals. Bene-Bac is recommended any time an animal experiences stress from changing nutritional or environmental conditions. Contains 20 million CFU per gram of viable lactic acid producing bacteria. Powder formula is easy to mix with water.   It comes in 4 different types – the Bene-bac designed for rabbits is the correct one to use.

Constipation: Bene-bac can also be used to treat constipation. It is important to ensure your capybara drinks enough water and has access to fresh water to drink 24 hours a day. A healthy diet of unrestricted access to fresh grass should ensure a capybara does not become constipated. Chewing coarse grasses is essential for the health of capybara teeth.

Product Information

Bene-Bac® Plus Small Animal Powder is recommended any time an animal experiences changing nutritional or environmental conditions.

  • Contains seven fat-encapsulated, common microorganisms found in intestinal tract of small mammals
  • Provides help for changing conditions, including, but not limited to birth, breeding, post-surgery, antibiotic therapy, weaning, worming, showing, boarding and travel
  • Guaranteed 20 million colony-forming units (CFU) of viable bacteria per gram
  • Recommended as part of the management program for all animals subjected to adverse conditions
  • May be used for regular maintenance

https://www.petag.com/products/bene-bac-plus-small-animal-powder

3. Milk Formula For Baby Capybaras:

This is the only milk formula specifically formulated for baby capybaras. It has a higher protein content and fat content than other milk formulas for most other species. It comes from Australia.

https://wombaroo.com/shop/ols/products/wombaroo-capybara-milk-replacer-2kg

Wombaroo Capybara Milk Replacer

DIRECTIONS FOR USE: To make 1 litre of milk mix 190g of powder with 870ml of preboiled warm water. Add about half of the water first, mix to a paste then make up to 1 litre with remaining water and mix thoroughly. An electric whisk can be used for mixing.

Feed Impact Colostrum Supplement to new-borns who did not receive sufficient maternal colostrum.

GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT: Typical birth weight is 1.5 – 2.0 kg. Average daily weight gain is about 50-100g per day until weaning at 3 months (approx. 8kg body weight)3 .

Analysis

  • Protein 42%
  • Fat 24%
  • Carbohydrate 22%
  • Ash 6%
  • Moisture 4%
  • Metabolisable Energy (ME) 20MJ/kg

©Wombaroo Food Products, Dec 2017. 10 Oborn Rd, Mt Barker SA 5251 http://www.wombaroo.com.au

CAPYBARA MILK REPLACER 1,2,3

TYPICAL ANALYSIS (Powder)

INGREDIENTS: Whole milk solids, whey protein, casein, vegetable oils, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, stabilised vitamin C, vitamins and minerals.

TYPICAL COMPOSITION PER LITRE OF PREPARED MILK Protein83gVitamin E14mgFolic Acid1.0mgSodium500mg
Fat49gVitamin K1.0mgVitamin B1219μgMagnesium80mg
-Omega 31.4gVitamin C520mgBiotin80μgZinc5.1mg
-Omega 63.4gThiamine7.1mgCholine130mgIron5.5mg
Carbohydrate42gRiboflavin1.9mgInositol100mgManganese3.1mg
Energy (ME)3.9MJNiacin29mgCalcium2.2gCopper0.8mg
Vitamin A470μgPantothenic Acid11mgPhosphorus1.6gIodine100μg
Vitamin D34.6mgPyridoxine2.4mgPotassium1400mgSelenium25μg
TYPICAL ANALYSIS (Powder) Protein42%
Fat24%
Carbohydrate22%
Ash6%
Moisture4%
Energy (ME)20 MJ/kg

https://wombaroo.com/shop/ols/products/wombaroo-capybara-milk-replacer-2kg

Bene-bac

Many people with capybaras and guinea pigs believe the probiotic ‘Bene-bac’ is a lifesaver. Some friends use it whenever the capybara’s poos become softer and sausage shaped, rather than the encapsulated, olive shaped faeces which capybaras living in their natural habitat pass. Bene-Bac Small Animal Powder is a concentrated live culture of four common digestive bacteria found in the intestinal tracts of mammals. Bene-Bac is recommended any time an animal experiences stress from changing nutritional or environmental conditions. Contains 20 million CFU per gram of viable lactic acid producing bacteria. Powder formula is easy to mix with water.   It comes in 4 different types – the Bene-bac designed for rabbits is the correct one to use.

Constipation: Bene-bac can also be used to treat constipation. It is important to ensure your capybara drinks enough water and has access to fresh water to drink 24 hours a day. A healthy diet of unrestricted access to fresh grass should ensure a capybara does not become constipated. Chewing coarse grasses is essential for the health of capybara teeth.

Product Information

Bene-Bac® Plus Small Animal Powder is recommended any time an animal experiences changing nutritional or environmental conditions.

  • Contains seven fat-encapsulated, common microorganisms found in intestinal tract of small mammals
  • Provides help for changing conditions, including, but not limited to birth, breeding, post-surgery, antibiotic therapy, weaning, worming, showing, boarding and travel
  • Guaranteed 20 million colony-forming units (CFU) of viable bacteria per gram
  • Recommended as part of the management program for all animals subjected to adverse conditions
  • May be used for regular maintenance

https://www.petag.com/products/bene-bac-plus-small-animal-powder

Essential Information If You Already Have a Capybara, Or Are Thinking of Getting a Capybara

These are blogs you might find useful if you are thinking of getting a pet capybara and you want your capybara to live a happy and healthy and long life.

Please be aware: There are 2 famous capybara owners who do everything in their power to persuade people not to go to my blogs. It is believed that they view me as a threat because of my knowledge of capybaras. It is tragic that there are people who put their own egos above the welfare of these fabulous animals.

If anyone tells you that they do not support Capybara World you can be sure that they view me as a threat because my information is well researched.

A Pet Capybara Should I Have One:

Momiji and Donut

Pet Capybara FAQs: The Questions People Always Ask

Capybara Diet. Includes Treatments for Dietary Health Issues.

What Should I Feed My Pet Capybara? The Capybara Diet

Pet Capybara Pool Size. What Size Pool Does My Capybara Need?

Capybaras Beware of Toxic Plants, Chemicals and Poisonous Animals Like Scorpions and Snakes. Humans Remove These from Your Land, Garden and Yard.

Capybara Health Warning: It Will Be Potentially Dangerous To Let Your Capybara Swim in a Chlorinated Swimming Pool Designed and Intended for Human Use

Protect Your Capybaras and Guinea Pigs from Power Cords and Electric Cables

Critical Care Formula for Capybaras. Capybara Health Care. This Formula Could Save the Life of Your Capybara.

Você pode ter uma experiência maravilhosa de capivara no Brasil no Sitio das Capivaras. You Can Have a Wonderful Capybara Experience in Brazil at Sitio das Capivaras

Há uma fazenda em São Pedro do Butiá de propriedade do Gervasio onde você pode passar o dia todo com as capivaras por apenas R $ 30 o carro (£ 4,50).

Existem parques em muitas cidades brasileiras com rebanhos de capivaras selvagens. Existem pelo menos 2 parques em Curitiba com manadas de capivaras selvagens. Algumas dessas capivaras podem não ter medo de humanos e podem permitir que você os acaricie. No entanto, sempre existe o perigo de que essas capivaras selvagens confiem muito nos humanos e isso possa deixá-las vulneráveis a ataques, ferimentos ou morte. Amigos meus em Curitiba dizem que nem todo mundo que visita os parques é simpático com as capivaras. Em 2016, antes dos Jogos Olímpicos realizados no Brasil, uma capivara foi morta com uma besta em um parque em Curitiba.

Tragicamente, esta capivara foi baleada com uma besta em um parque em Curitiba, e posteriormente morreu. Tragically, this capybara was shot with a crossbow in a park in Curitiba, and subsequently died

As Capivaras vivem uma vida natural em um habitat gramado com acesso a um grande corpo de água. (Não estive lá, então não sei se é um rio ou lagoa.)

Esta é a página deles no Facebook com muitas fotos e vídeos das capivaras:

https://www.facebook.com/sitiodascapivaras/

O Sítio das Capivaras está localizado na Linha Taipão Fundo no município de São Pedro do Butiá-RS.

Este é um vídeo da bela cidade de São Pedro do Butia, incluindo alguns de seus encantadores moradores de capivara:

There are parks in many Brazilian towns and cities with resident herds of wild capybaras. There are at least 2 parks in Curitiba with herds of wild capybaras. Some of these capybaras may not be frightened of humans and may let you pet them. However, there is always the danger that these wild capybaras might become too trusting of humans and this could leave them open to attack, injury or death. Friends of mine in Curitiba say not everyone who visits the parks are nice to the capybaras. In 2016, prior to the Olympic Games held in Brazil, a capybara was killed with a crossbow in a park in Curitiba.

Tragicamente, esta capivara foi baleada com uma besta em um parque em Curitiba, e posteriormente morreu. Tragically, this capybara was shot with a crossbow in a park in Curitiba, and subsequently died

There is a farm in Sao Pedro do Butiá owned by Gervasio where you can spend all day with the capybaras for only R$ 30 per car (£4.50).

The Capybaras live a natural life in a grassy habitat with access to a large body of water. (I haven’t been there so I don’t know if it’s a river or pond.)

This is their Facebook page with lots of photos and videos of the capybaras:

https://www.facebook.com/sitiodascapivaras/

Sítio das Capivaras is located on the Linha Taipão Fundo municipality of São Pedro do Butiá-RS.

This is a video of the beautiful town Sao Pedro do Butia, including some of its enchanting capybara residents: